Academy

YOUNG OLÉ (AGES 15-18)

The Young Olé player is at the top of the academy's development pathway and between the game training and performance phases of his or her football career.
Players in the Young Olé programme train 5 – 6 days per week with one game on the weekend. Individual training loads are monitored by Olé staff. Young Olé players have the opportunity of playing in the top two divisions of amateur football in Wellington, NZ; The Men’s Central League and The Capital Premier League. Young Olé players also have the opportunity of trialing for Stirling Sports National League Youth and 1st teams. Residential players from across New Zealand (Auckland, Hamilton, Rotorua, Christchurch, Nelson) make up a portion of the Young Olé training group.

Full-Time Football

The Young Olé calendar runs full-time from mid January to mid December with players receiving “football breaks” during school holidays and over summer

Personal Development

Young Olé players partake in a personal development curriculum administered through Lesson.ly, attend regular mentorship meetings with Olé staff and volunteer in community grassroots initiatives.

Player Placement

As Young Olé players near the end of their time at the academy, the Olé staff aid in the placement of players to U.S. universities and professional environments domestically and abroad.

Scholarship Opportunities

Players who excel in the classroom, perform on the pitch, and demonstrate solid character throughout their time at the academy receive recommendations that often result in scholarship opportunities.

The Young Olé programme offers the following benefits


A direct pathway from junior football to the senior amateur 1st and 2nd Teams.


The opportunity to play for one of New Zealand’s most prestigious football clubs, Western Suburbs.


A periodised training scheme overseen by “A Licensed” Technical Director and former New Zealand International, Declan Edge.


A full-time training environment and introduction to a professional football atmosphere


A structured environment with a consistent message and philosophy in the style of play.


The opportunity to move players out of their comfort zones through Olé’s Player Development Pathway.


Mentorship programme with academy trainers who are former international, professional or U.S. university players.


Academic support through Young Olé tutors or residential staff.


Access to top sports physicians and consultants in New Zealand.


A proven pathway for Young Olé players at U.S. universities and professional clubs.


Personal development programme overseen by Lesson.ly learning automation software.


Agreement with Pro-Active Physio 4 Corners of Health.

Young Olé players have represented the academy at a number of academic institutions and professional clubs including:

  • Anderson University (NCAA Division II)
  • Auckland City FC (New Zealand Stirling Sports Premiership)
  • Bucknell University (NCAA Division I)
  • Bowling Greene University (NCAA Division I)
  • California State University, Dominguez Hills (NCAA Division II)
  • California State University, San Bernardino (NCAA Division II)
  • Chivas USA (Major League Soccer)
  • Columbus Crew SC (Major League Soccer)
  • Connecticut College (NCAA Division III)
  • Dartmouth College (NCAA Division I)
  • Drake University (NCAA Division I)
  • Falkenberg FF (Swedish Allsvenskan)
  • Florida Southern College (NCAA Division II)
  • Fulham FC (English Premier League)
  • GAIS IK (Swedish Superettan)
  • Hartwick University (NCAA Division I)
  • Los Angeles Galaxy (Major League Soccer)
  • Loyola University Chicago (NCAA Division I)
  • Marshall University (NCAA Division I)
  • Missouri State University (NCAA Division I)
  • Mjallby IF (Swedish Allsvenskan)
  • New Jersey Institute of Technology (NCAA Division I)
  • Northwestern University (NCAA Division I)

  • PEC Zwolle (Dutch Eredevisie)
  • Portland Timbers (Major League Soccer)
  • San Diego State University (NCAA Division I)
  • San Jose Earthquakes (Major League Soccer)
  • Seattle University (NCAA Division I)
  • Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (NCAA Division I)
  • Stabaek IK (Norwegian Tippeligaen)
  • St. Johns (NY) University (NCAA Division I)
  • St. Edwards (TX) University (NCAA Division II)
  • Stanford University (NCAA Division I)
  • University of California, Santa Barbara (NCAA Division I)
  • University of Charleston (NCAA Division II)
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst (NCAA Division I)
  • University of Missouri Kansas City (NCAA Division I)
  • University of New Mexico (NCAA Division I)
  • University of Pretoria Amatuks FC (South African Super League)
  • University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (NCAA Division I)
  • University of Wisconsin Milwaukee (NCAA Division I)
  • Vincenza Calcio (Serie B, Italy)
  • Wellington Phoenix (A-League)
  • Willamette University (NCAA Division III)
  • Xavier University (NCAA Division I)

YOUNG OLÉ 1 (AGES 13-14)

The Young Olé 1 player is between the skill acquisition phase and game training phases of his or her football career.
The Young Olé 1 curriculum is aimed at preparing players for the full-time Young Olé programme as well as Under-17 and Senior Men’s and Women’s football. The Young Olé 1 player is still in the skill acquisition phase of his or her football career while also developing critical decision making skills and a tactical understanding of the game.

Individual Development

At this stage in the footballer’s career individual development within the context of a team environment takes precedence over winning matches.

Decision-Making

Sessions are built primarily around small-sided games and possession based “rondo” exercises that develop core skills and promote football decision-making.

Core Skills

The Young Olé 1 player is regularly playing 11 v 11 football and learning how to apply functional core skills within the context of a game setting.

Trainer to Player Ratio

Consistent with World’s “best practice” trainer to player ratios in the Young Olé 1 training group rarely exceed 1:16.

 

YOUNG OLÉ 2 (AGES 11-12)

The Young Olé 2 player is primarily in the skill acquisition phase of his or her football career.
The Skill acquisition phase focuses primarily on developing the footballer’s technical foundation and functional game skills.

Core Skills

The Young Olé 2 curriculum places a major emphasis on developing the individual footballer’s four core skills that make up 95% of football actions by outfield players when in possession of the ball: ball striking, first touch, 1 v 1 and running with the ball.

Individual Development

At this stage in the footballer’s career individual development within the context of a team environment takes precedence over winning matches.

Small-Sided Games

Young Olé 2 training introduces players to a possession based style of play. Sessions are built primarily around small-sided games and possession based “rondo” exercises that develop core skills and promote football decision-making.

Trainer to Player Ratio

Consistent with World’s “best practice” trainer to player ratios in the Young Olé 2 training group rarely exceed 1:14.

 

YOUNG OLÉ 3 (AGES 8-10)

The Young Olé 3 player is between the discovery phase and skill acquisition phase of his or her football career.
The discovery phase places a major emphasis on fostering a fun, enjoyable and unstructured learning environment, while the skill acquisition phase focuses primarily on developing the footballer’s technical foundation and functional game skills.

“Ball-Mastery”

The Young Olé 3 curriculum centres around “ball-mastery” drills aimed at developing the individual footballer’s four core skills: ball striking, first touch, 1 v 1 and running with the ball.

“Street-Football” Environment

Young Olé 3 training often replicates a “street-football” environment where unstructured free-play opportunities are widespread.

Foster a Love For the Beautiful Game

Perhaps most importantly, the Young Olé 3 programme aims to foster a love for the beautiful game in the young Kiwi player.

Trainer to Player Ratio

Consistent with World’s “best practice” trainer to player ratios in the Young Olé 3 training group rarely exceed 1:12.

RESIDENTIAL ACADEMY

The residential academy is a major component for footballers residing outside of the Porirua region.
The residential academy provides a supportive, safe and secure environment for the young player. Our holistic focus on developing the scholar, human and footballer allows residential players to excel both on and off the football pitch. We believe in providing a challenging, yet supportive environment in order to strengthen the physical, mental and emotional maturity of each individual.

Support From Residential Staff

Players attend local, public schools and academic progress is monitored by Olé staff in coordination with school deans. Those in need of academic assistance receive support from residential staff, or peer support via tutors within the Young Olé programme.

Nutritional Support Provided

Three balanced meals each weekday are provided and residents are responsible for the purchase and preparation of their own food on weekends. Diets are closely monitored by staff and nutritional support is provided by Proactive4Health.

Full-Time Staff and Interns

Full-time staff and interns - typically recent graduates from U.S. Universities - live alongside players in residence, and are responsible for serving in a variety of mentorship, support and advisory roles. They are to also ensure a safe, friendly and welcoming environment.

Learn to Live Independently

The Residential Academy is designed to prepare the New Zealand player for life abroad at U.S. Universities and professional clubs. Residential players learn how to live independently and alongside others in a positive and engaging environment.

 

Past residents include:

Ryan Thomas
NZ All Whites
Jesse Edge
NZ All Whites
Cory Brown
NZ Under-20’s

Harry Edge
Auckland City FC
Mohammad “Pedro” Awad
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Kyle Adams
San Diego State University